NYC Honorary Street Names

"T" Honorary Streets: Manhattan

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Teachers College Way (Manhattan)
Present name:West 120th Street
Location:Between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue
Honoree: This co-naming honors Teachers College, the oldest and largest graduate school of education in the United States. For over 100 years, Teachers College has been a leader in the field of education and is ranked among the nation’s best. (Dickens)
LL:2013/131
Ted Buczek Way (Manhattan)
Present name:None
Location:At the intersection of Fort George Avenue and Audubon Avenue
Honoree: Ted Buczek (1926-2010) served in the United States Navy during WWII and later worked at Swann Manufacturing in New Jersey. He was a member of the Pulaski Association within the NYPD. His son Michael was killed in 1988 at the age of 24 after he and his partner struggled with two drug-dealing suspects. Ted started the Police Officer Michael Buczek Foundation and the Michael Buczek Little League, which today serves about 500 Washington Heights youths each year. These foundations give children safe places to play while being mentored by NYPD officers. (Rodriguez)
LL:2017/110
Ted Corbitt Way (Manhattan)
Present name:None
Location:At the intersection of 228th Street and Broadway
Honoree: Ted Corbitt (1919-2007), a pioneer of ultramarathon running in the United States, was a co-founder and the first president of the New York Road Runners Club.
LL:2013/50
Teddy Gleason St (Manhattan)
Present name:Morris Street
Location:Between West and Washington Streets.
Honoree: Thomas William (Teddy) Gleason (1900-1992) was the oldest of 13 children. He quit school at 15 to join his father and grandfather on the docks. He worked many different jobs on the docks until 1932, when he was blacklisted by employers for his activities on behalf of the International Longshoremen's Association. When the union was recognized under the New Deal, he returned to the docks and rose in union ranks. He was elected International President of the ILA in 1963 and continued in that post for nearly a quarter century.
LL:1997/11
The Bowery Mission Way (Manhattan)
Present name:227 Bowery at Prince Street
Location:Between Rivington Street and Stanton Street
Honoree: The Bowery Mission is the third oldest Rescue Mission in the United States. It has been serving New York City’s homeless since 1879, providing meals, shelter, showers, clothing and medical care.
LL:2009/92
The Claude Brown Corner (Manhattan)
Present name:none
Location:the intersection of 145th Street and Frederick Douglas Boulevard
Honoree: Claude Brown (1937-2002) was the author of the 1965 novel “Manchild in the Promised Land,” based on his own childhood growing up in Harlem. Sent to reform school for the first time at the age of 11, he eventually became a lawyer, writer and lecturer. The adjacent block of Frederick Douglass Boulevard has been named Manchild Way, in recognition of his book.
LL:2003/34
The Honorable Percy E. Sutton Avenue (Manhattan)
Present name:Fifth Avenue
Location:Between 124th Street at Marcus Garvey Park and 142nd Street
Honoree: Percy Sutton (1920-2009), after serving as a New York State Assemblyman, was Borough President of Manhattan from 1966 to 1977. In 1967 he convened the first caucus of Afro-American elected and appointed officials at the University of Chicago. He was also a successful businessman and was Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce.
LL:2007/28
The Order Sons of Italy Way (Manhattan)
Present name:Grand Street
Location:between Mott Street and Mulberry Street
Honoree: The Order of Sons of Italy is the largest and oldest national organization for men and women of Italian heritage in the United States. Founded as a mutual aid society on Grand Street in 1905, it now has more than 600,000 members and supporters and more that 700 chapters across the United States.
LL:2004/08
Theodore Roosevelt Way (Manhattan)
Present name:20th St
Location:Bounded by Broadway and Park Ave South
Honoree: Named for the 26th President of the United States. The Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial, a reconstruction of the brownstone house in which Roosevelt was born in 1858, is located at 2 East 20th Street.
LL:1995/6
Thomas A. Wylie Plaza (Manhattan)
Present name:None
Location:SE corner of New St and Pitt St
Honoree: Thomas Wylie (1964-1995) lived in Whitestone, Queens, for most of his youth. He joined the NYFD in 1994. On December 27 of that year, while fighting a two-alarm fire in Lower Manhattan, he was overcome by smoke after he and his fellow firefighters had rescued 18 residents by aerial ladders. Wylie suffered two cardiac arrests. He was rushed to Bronx Municipal Hospital and then Montefiore Medical Center. He died of carbon monoxide poisoning on January 3, 1995.
LL:1996/30
Thurgood Marshall Boulevard (Manhattan)
Present name:Edgecombe Avenue
Location:Between 150th Street and 155th Street
Honoree: Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993) was an American jurist and the first African-American to serve on the United States Supreme Court. He served for 24 years compiling a liberal record that included strong support for Constitutional protection of individual rights.
LL:2009/25
Tito Puente Way (Manhattan)
Present name:East 110th Street
Location:Fifth Avenue and First Avenue
Honoree: Tito Puente (1923-2000) lived in East Harlem. As a composer and performer of Latin jazz and salsa, he was perhaps the most important figure in America’s Latin Music scene in a career spanning more than 50 years.
LL:2000/49
Tommy Dowd Way (Manhattan)
Present name:None
Location:Southwest corner of Isham Street and Seaman Avenue
Honoree: Tommy Dowd (b. 1964) grew up in Inwood, and attended Dominican College. His life was cut short on September 11, 2001 at the World Trade Center where he was working for Cantor Fitzgerald.
LL:2006/13
Town Hall Way (Manhattan)
Present name:West 43rd Street
Location:The north side of West 43rd Street between Sixth Avenue and Broadway.
Honoree: This naming marked the 75th anniversary of Town Hall, which is the site of many important lectures, civic events, and musical performances. Speakers here have included Winston Churchill and Eleanor Roosevelt. The 1,500-seat hall was built by the League for Political Education, an organization of women active in the suffrage movement. Opened in 1921, it is now a National Historic Landmark.
LL:1996/60


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